Recent Articles

Do resulting trusts form a unitary category, or are there analytically distinct types of resulting trusts?

Essays // Wednesday, 23rd November 2011

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An essay by 3rd year Jurisprudence student, Julius Grower Assessed by C.E. Webb, Oxford University Mark Achieved: First Class (73%) Written in January 2011 Word Count 3323 The best answers to legal questions are those which involve the consistent application of law, rather than the making of ad hoc decisions. The consistent application of law depends […]

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Barker – a critical assessment

Essays // Tuesday, 22nd November 2011

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Critically assess the judgments of the House of Lords in Barker. Would you have sided with the majority or the minority? An essay by Sarah Curry, First Year Jurisprudence Assessed by Professor Beatrice Krebs, Oxford University Mark Achieved: First Class (72%) Written in June 2011 Barker[i] deals with the area of causation in the tort of negligence. […]

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James v London Borough of Greenwich – a critical assessment

Essays // Tuesday, 22nd November 2011

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An Essay by Patrick Fahy, 2nd year LLB student Assessed by Dr. Deirdre McCann, University of Manchester Mark Achieved: First Class (80%) Word Count: 2,497 ‘The decision of the Court of Appeal in James v London Borough of Greenwich finally resolved the legal status of temporary agency workers to the benefit of both the private recruitment […]

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Patent Enforcement: Defence of innovation or industrial poker?

Essays // Tuesday, 22nd November 2011

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An essay by 3rd  year law student, Jemille Gibson Assessed by Mark Saunders, Kingston University Mark achieved: First Class (74%) Written in June 2011 Word Count: 2005 The root of the question concerns the way patents are enforced, whether they are enforced and applied for to protect legal rights, or whether they are used more […]

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The Supreme Court extends justiciability of claims in Lucasfilm v Ainsworth

Articles, Essays // Tuesday, 22nd November 2011

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A casenote by Sophia Hurst, 4th year, Oxford University Written during a vacation scheme at Norton Rose LLP August 2011 Reviewed by partners On 27 July the Supreme Court of England and Wales handed down a judgement determining two important issues of intellectual property law. The first was to clarify definition of “sculpture” in the […]

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Section 14(2D) Sale of Goods Act 1979 – More Regressive than Progressive?

Articles // Thursday, 27th October 2011

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  An essay by 2nd year LLB student Ren-En Lim Assessed by Dr Robert Stokes, University of Liverpool Mark achieved: First Class (72%) Written in March 2011 Introduction Ask any High Street store if they know about the provisions and potential implications under s.14(2) of the Sale of Goods Act 1979, and chances are that […]

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The practice of plea-bargaining ensures the efficient negotiation of justice and should be actively encouraged by defence lawyers

Essays // Wednesday, 14th September 2011

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An Essay by Ed Wallis, 2nd year LLB student Bristol University Mark Achieved: First Class (85%) Word Count: 2,919 The practice of plea bargaining, though efficient, ensures the negotiation not of justice, but of injustice. However, as plea bargaining is so often in what is perceived as the best interests of suspects, defence lawyers are under […]

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The law on complicity is not as complex, uncertain and anomalous as is commonly assumed

Essays // Tuesday, 6th September 2011

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An essay by 1st year BA in Law student, Reuben Vandercruyssen Assessed by  Sarah Steele, Christ’s College, Cambridge Mark achieved: First Class (71%) Written in February 2011 Word Count: 1491 The undoubted complexities, uncertainties and anomalies of the law of secondary liability are not as significant and problematic as is commonly assumed. Of course, the […]

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The use of judge-alone trials in cases of jury tampering, case comment of R v T and others [2010]

Essays // Monday, 1st August 2011

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by 2nd year LLB student, Jennie Vinnac Assessed by Dr Penny Darbyshire, Kingston University Mark achieved: First Class (74%) Written in March 2011 Word count: 1,494 The fairness of criminal trials has rested upon the use of a jury for over 400 years. The ability to be judged by a panel of your peers is […]

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Insurance premium ruling criticised

News // Thursday, 30th June 2011

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  A European court ruling which could see an end to lower, women-only insurance premiums “goes against the grain” of a common-sense approach to equality, a UK minister has said. Financial Secretary to the Treasury Mark Hoban said he would consult on changes to the UK Equality Act in the light of the decision by […]

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